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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus found in the catalog.

electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus

Ann Morris Duncan

electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus

by Ann Morris Duncan

  • 231 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published in [Eugene, Ore .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Reaction time,
  • Muscular sense,
  • Arm

  • Edition Notes

    Series[Oregon. University. School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Microform publications]
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 sheets.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14628735M

    Unlike response-centered approaches to psychology, which consider the organisms activity more or less determined by the actual stimulus information, the action approach emphasizes intentional control as being simultaneous with (or even prior to) informational control of activity, assuming that intentional processes fix the rules for the. Study PSYCH Study Guide ( Chan) flashcards from StudyBlue on StudyBlue.

    kinesthetic sense). Our long term goals are: (1) to study the kinesthetic sense as a communication channel, (2) to compare performance through the kinesthetic sense with that through other senses, and (3) to compare the ability to receive motional stimulation with the ability to produce the same movement patterns. The ability to tell time and use time related concepts, making and keeping appointments, using a phone, and other skills to help learners stay connected and interact with others in the community are also assessed in this protocol. Community Participation Skills Protocol includes: 1. Basic Mobility. 2. Community Knowledge. 3. Shopping. 4. Meals.

      A large response time improvement is observed when the stimulus sequence isrepeated, even when subjects are unaware that a sequence exists. In addition, changing the location of the response keys interferes with SRT learning, but changing the fingers that push the keys does not [44]. The Human Systems Integration Division at NASA Ames Research Center, advances human-centered design and aerospace systems to make dramatic improvements in safety, efficiency and mission success.


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Electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus by Ann Morris Duncan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. An electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus. [Ann Morris Duncan]. An electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus by Ann Morris Duncan University Microfilms, A Xerox, []Author: Ann Morris Duncan.

An electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus by Ann Morris Duncan [University Microfilms], [] マイクロ形態(マイクロフィルム (リール))Author: Ann Morris Duncan.

Duncan, Ann Morris. An electromyographical study of response times to a kinesthetic stimulus. Thesis, Texas at Austin, BF H Hagerman, Betty Sue. Effects of age and success on arousal levels of advanced female tennis competitors before and after tournament competition.

Thesis,Texas at Austin, BF L Lanphear, Margaret L. Fractionated reaction and reflex times. Electromyographical (EMG) motor responses may be elicited by loud acoustic stimuli in humans and vary based on presentation methods and body position. The purpose of this study was to investigate the EMG responses caused by different presentation methods of acoustic stimuli in a supine body position.

Participants lay supine and maintained a voluntary plantar flexion. This leads us to examine how the perceptual deadzone is affected by the rate of change in the kinesthetic force stimulus. In this chapter, we take up this particular study. For this purpose, we design an experiment where a user is exposed to either a linearly increasing (positive slope) or decreasing (negative slope) haptic force stimulus with.

Vegman () defines: “Response time is the time which passes from when the stimulus is presented until completion of the movement following the stimulus. The response time consists of the movement and response time.

The purpose of this study was to examine whether the baseball players' shorter Go/Nogo reaction time (RT) was influenced by stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) effects. Respectively, these are the Decision Time factor (Math-Classification, Stimulus-Response Compatibility, and Card-Sorting) and Movement Time factor (Fitts' Movement and Card-Dealing).

In the present study these two factors failed to separate, plausibly because only two marker tests of the Movement Time factor were employed.

The kinesthetic stimulus that elicits the response may be evoked in a number of ways, but another common strategy that relates to our limb displacement strategy has been to elicit a normal resisting contraction by the subject against a resistance and then provide, during the course of the movement, an unexpected change in the resistance [see Crago, Houk, and.

In the current study we tested whether multiple orientations in kinesthetic learning affected how flexibly spatial information is stored and later used in making location judgments. Stimulus-Response Compatibility and Practice 49 In summary, we have presented a model of stimulus-response com- patibility and practice, built out of submodels for performance and learn- ing.

The performance model is supported by its ability to model effectively stimulus-response compatibility experiments and by the pervasive use of goal.

Kinesthetic learners are thought to enjoy being physically active, tend to excel at sports and often have fast reaction times. The VAK/VARK model of learning suggests that people with this learning style may prefer lessons that involve movement such as performing an experiment, working with a group or performing a skit.

Test. A random stimulus presentation and response recording was used for eye-hand response time with the help of audio-visual response time equipment. Results: Athletes had statistically significantly (presponse time (i.e.

the faster) and higher visuospatial intelligence compared to nonathletes. Stress may be defined as a nonspecific response to perceived environmental threats (called stressors).But a particular environmental change (a demand or an event) may be perceived by one person as stressful and by another as benign.

An examination is, for example, likely to be less stressful for a student who has mastered all homework assignments than it is for a. According to the results of response time and accuracy, it appears that only the first patient had a higher response time and lower accuracy on the affected limb than the other.

Mainly, it is known that IMI is a tool for assessing the condition of. Three times simple auditory reaction time was taken, and out of them fastest response was used for this study. Full series of tests takes time of about min. All tests were recorded in sitting comfortable and relaxed position in the chair on before lunch and with no any tight clothing which substantially restricts discomfort.

In other words, this isn't a true measure of reaction time, since it takes different amounts of time for the different sensory inputs to get to the brain.

That being said, it makes the experiment even more interesting, since you wouldn't expect such large differences once the signal is already in the brain. Objective: The purpose of this study was to find out whether the simple reaction time was faster for auditory or visual stimulus and the factors responsible for improving the performance of the athlete.

Methodology: 14 subjects were as- signed randomly into groups consisting of 2 members. Both the members from each group performed both the visual and auditory tests. response time. time interval involving both RT and MT; the time from onset of the signal to the completion of a response states that RT will increase logarithmically as the number of stimulus response choices increases.

cost-benefit trade-off. or of engaging in visual or kinesthetic imagery of the performance of a skill or part of a skill. Researchers like Ladd and Woodworth established stimulus reaction periods for visual, touch and audition.

According to W., these earlier researchers established that reaction to auditory stimulus was the fastest at ms followed by touch at ms while visual stimulus lagged behind at ms.The book also discusses the effect of the rate of change of kinesthetic stimuli on the JND, temporal resolution for the perceivability of kinesthetic force stimuli, dependence of kinesthetic perception on the task being performed, the sequential effect on kinesthetic perception, and, correspondingly, on the perceptual dead zone.

The reaction time is the period from hearing the gun until prior to leaving the blocks. Movement time: it is the time from to the completion of the task.

Response time: it is from the onset the stimulus to the completion of task. In sports the more the choices the performer has to make, the slower the response time will be.